World History I

Bruce A. McMenomy, Ph.D. and Christe A. McMenomy, Ph.D. for Scholars Online
2017-18: Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time

2017

September

6   11   13   18   20   25   27 

October

2   4   11   16   18   23  25   30  

November

1   6   8   13   15   20   22   27   29  

December

4   6   11   13   18   20  

2018

January

8   10   15   17   22   24   29   31  

February

5   7   12   14   19   21   26   28  

March

5   7   12   14   19   21  

April

2   4   9   11   16   18   23   25   30  

May

2   7   9   14   16   21   23   28  

Chapter 3: The Foundation of Indian Society
to 300 C.E.

13: Wed, Oct 18, 2017

Please post in the forum for the day a short essay in response to this question:

Indian religion represents a crossroads of theistic and non-theistic (not to say atheistic) religious currents. Hinduism in its earliest forms is polytheistic; some modern Hindus would identify themselves as monotheistic, viewing the various gods as aspects of one divine entity. Buddhism really eschews gods as such altogether, understanding the world itself in terms of a collective consciousness of which all living things are a part. Some strands of both Hinduism and Buddhism hold to the notion that the visible world is maya — that is, illusory. How do these fundamental distinctions in how the world is understood affect the way people holding those beliefs interact and live their lives? Consider: