World History I

Bruce A. McMenomy, Ph.D. and Christe A. McMenomy, Ph.D. for Scholars Online
2017-18: Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time

2017

September

6   11   13   18   20   25   27 

October

2   4   11   16   18   23  25   30  

November

1   6   8   13   15   20   22   27   29  

December

4   6   11   13   18   20  

2018

January

8   10   15   17   22   24   29   31  

February

5   7   12   14   19   21   26   28  

March

5   7   12   14   19   21  

April

2   4   9   11   16   18   23   25   30  

May

2   7   9   14   16   21   23   28  

Chapter 4: China’s Classical Age
to 221 B.C.E.

17: Wed, Nov 1, 2017

Please post in the forum for the day a short essay in response to this question:

Traditional thought in the ancient Chinese world — which has to some extent endured in Chinese thinking ever since — is an interesting convergence of what we would traditionally distinguish as theology and philosophy. We have talked about:

Pick any two of those four, and compare their implications for the growth of a coherent culture (especially as set in China, but you may want to be broader). Can the two you have chosen be held simultaneously by a thinker who is at least somewhat flexible? (For some pairs, the answer would seem to be certainly not; for others, it could work.)

One of the things that's interesting in China is the way its culture has assimilated wildly divergent patterns of thought and brought them at least into a dialogue one with another. They may not agree, but they do seem to coexist in most cases. We'll see later in the year what some of the consequences are for the rise and fall of Legalism; the strange and sometimes uneasy alliance between Buddhism and Taoism is considerably more complex and longer-lasting.