World History I

Bruce A. McMenomy, Ph.D. and Christe A. McMenomy, Ph.D. for Scholars Online
2017-18: Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time

2017

September

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October

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November

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December

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2018

January

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February

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March

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April

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May

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Chapter 5: The Greek Experience
3500 to 100 B.C.E.

19: Wed, Nov 8, 2017

Please post in the forum for the day a short essay in response to this question:

We have seen a number of different kinds of communities in other civilization, including families, cities and states of different sizes, and religious associations (e.g., Buddhist monasteries). Here we see two further types emerging — the intellecual communities embodied in such schools as the Academhy of Plato, the Lyceum of Aristotle, and the schools of Pythagoras and Euclid. There is also the looser community created and a shared artistic or literary experience. The Greek world allowed many opportunities for this kind of thing with its global appreciation of things like the Homeric poems and Athenian tragedies. What distiniguishes these kinds of communities from the others we've mentioned, and how can we account for their longevity and even transcendence of place and time?