World History I

Bruce A. McMenomy, Ph.D. and Christe A. McMenomy, Ph.D. for Scholars Online
2017-18: Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time

2017

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2018

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Chapter 5: The Greek Experience
3500 to 100 B.C.E.

21: Wed, Nov 15, 2017

Please post in the forum for the day a short essay in response to this question:

This one is somewhat synthetic, but especially in the fourth question of the chapter we'd like you to think about these things in combination with one another.

Classical Greece for a long time has been revered for the depth and extent of its vision — especially its vision of human potential and activity. Consider the following:

Each had a vision that left a legacy that outlived him. What forms do those legacies take? How does their vision survive their ability to direct or control its execution? How much is embodied in prescriptive writing (rules, etc.), and how much in narrative (story)? Which do you think is the more potent in preserving a legacy? How did the Greeks deal with that?