World History I

Bruce A. McMenomy, Ph.D. and Christe A. McMenomy, Ph.D. for Scholars Online
2017-18: Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time

2017

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2018

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Chapter 7: East Asia and the Spread of Buddhism
221 B.C.E. to 800 C.E.

28: Mon, Dec 11, 2017

Please post in the forum for the day a short essay in response to this question:

We have talked for a while now about the potential confrontation and collision between imperium (“officially” ordained power) and auctoritas. In China under the Qin dynasty, the state attempted to gather up or acquire all available auctoritas for itself, and to crush any manifestation of any kind of power that could oppose it. In Han China and later, things changed. Confucian authorities were reintroduced to the running of the government, and these scholars felt empowered to speak up openly in opposition to the imperial administration. Later as Buddhism moved into China more thoroughly, it provided another, different kind of auctoritas, not at odds with the Confucian antecedents, but at a different level. Eventually it was at least partly suppressed too. Discuss that process, considering in particular: