World History I

Bruce A. McMenomy, Ph.D. and Christe A. McMenomy, Ph.D. for Scholars Online
2017-18: Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time

2017

September

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October

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November

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2018

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February

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April

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May

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Chapter 14: Europe in the Middle Ages
800 to 1450

55: Wed, Apr 4, 2018

Please post in the forum for the day a short essay in response to this question:

In the millennium following the collapse of the Roman Empire in the West, but especially in the latter half (950-1450), a number of new communities, and new kinds of communities — political, religious, economic, social, and academic — form throughout Europe. Almost all of these are characterized by their own internal hierarches (levels of administration and organization); sometimes they seem not to interfere with each other, and other times they come into open hostility. In the third question for this unit we'll focus on one particularly noteworthy collision of administrative structures (the Investiture Controversy) as it relates to competing patterns and structures of power. For now, however, let's look at some of the others. How do the following clusters of association relate to one another, either in cooperation or potentially in conflict? Pick at least three points of intersection and explore the possibilities, either within the category or across categories. Consider:

In particular, consider what conflicting claims belonging to such different communities might impose upon members. A few possible examples to get you asking the right kinds of related question: if a lord held lands from different overlords (as often happened), what was his responsibility when those lords came into conflict? Why, when England and France were embroiled in the Hundred Years' War, was it still possible for a cleric/scholar to get safe passage from one country to the other to study? What about the potential strife between ecclesiastical authority and the freedom of the university (also by the church)? You may consider others as well.