World History I

Bruce A. McMenomy, Ph.D. and Christe A. McMenomy, Ph.D. for Scholars Online
2017-18: Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time

2017

September

6   11   13   18   20   25   27 

October

2   4   11   16   18   23  25   30  

November

1   6   8   13   15   20   22   27   29  

December

4   6   11   13   18   20  

2018

January

8   10   15   17   22   24   29   31  

February

5   7   12   14   19   21   26   28  

March

5   7   12   14   19   21  

April

2   4   9   11   16   18   23   25   30  

May

2   7   9   14   16   21   23   28  

Chapter 15: Europe in the Renaissance and Reformation
1350 to 1600

58: Mon, Apr 16, 2018

Please read the chapter and take the quiz by midnight on Sun, Apr 15, 2018.
Please also post in the forum for the day a short essay in response to this question:

Again, there are no significant completely new physical resources, but increased trade provided access to a wider range of goods, disposable income for aristocrats (historically patrons of artists and, more recently, of scientists), as well as causing significant growth in the urban middle class, who were often seeking recognition for scholarship, perception, or generosity. How did patronage fund arts, sciences, and literature, and what were both the advantages and disadvantages to the artist or scientist who depended on a wealthy and well-placed patron to gain recognition (and income) for his (or her) efforts? How did artists or scientists without a single major patron find support for their work? Consider: