World History I

Bruce A. McMenomy, Ph.D. and Christe A. McMenomy, Ph.D. for Scholars Online
2017-18: Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time

2017

September

6   11   13   18   20   25   27 

October

2   4   11   16   18   23  25   30  

November

1   6   8   13   15   20   22   27   29  

December

4   6   11   13   18   20  

2018

January

8   10   15   17   22   24   29   31  

February

5   7   12   14   19   21   26   28  

March

5   7   12   14   19   21  

April

2   4   9   11   16   18   23   25   30  

May

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Chapter 15: Europe in the Renaissance and Reformation
1350 to 1600

59: Wed, Apr 18, 2018

Please post in the forum for the day a short essay in response to this question:

In medieval Europe, recognition of individual accomplishments was limited primarily to political achievements by kings and other political or church leaders. Artistic efforts like jewelry crafting, silver and gold work, stained glass windows, and architecture were typically unsigned, and even if we have names associated with some of the efforts, we usually know little of the artists themselves. In the Renaissance, however, individual artists not only gained recognition by signing their works, but were often sought out by clients who wanted to themselves gain recognition by association.

How does the concept of the individual change between the medieval period and the Renaissance? In particular, how does the recognition of individual effort encourage artistic achievement — and how might it suppress it? How might recognition of individual expression lead to “freedom of conscience”, or the right of an individual to independent action outside of or even in conflict with his community? Consider: